Reconstruction of the Maxillectomy Defect

Maxillary defects can be the result of traumatic, infectious or pathological causes. No matter the cause of a maxillectomy defect, reconstruction is a difficult task. Reconstruction ranges from prosthetic obturation all the way to free-tissue transfer and everything in between. This session will discuss all the different options, including types of reconstruction, timing of reconstruction and clinical cases.

Learning Objectives

At the conclusion of this program, participants should be able to:

  1. Identify the different types of maxillectomy defects. 
  2. Cite which reconstruction techniques are available for reconstruction of a maxillectomy defect. 
  3. Describe the pros and cons of each reconstruction technique. 

Nicholas F. Callahan, DMD, MD, MPH
Assistant Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago, Illinois
Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

Michael Y. Nagai, DDS, MD
Surgeon
Erie County Medical Center
Buffalo, New York
Disclosure: Nothing to disclose.

An Internet-based CDE/CME Activity
Original Release Date: October 1, 2021
Expiration Date: October 1, 2024
Estimated time to complete this educational activity: 1.0 hours
Method of participation: Self-Study

Nicholas F. Callahan, DMD, MD, MPH

Assistant Professor, Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

University of Illinois at Chicago

Dr. Callahan is an Assistant Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at University of Illinois at Chicago, where he also serves as the co-director of the Head and Neck Cancer Center Integrated Practice Unit. Most recently, Dr. Callahan completed a Fellowship in Head and Neck Oncology and Microvascular Reconstructive Surgery at the University of Maryland at Baltimore Medical Center. He received his medical school education and General Surgery training at SUNY Downstate, and his Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery training at Kings County Hospital Center in Brooklyn, New York. He attended the University of Pittsburgh School, of Dental Medicine for his dental school training, and also received his Masters of Public Health degree at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health.

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose

Michael Y. Nagai, DDS, MD

Surgeon

Erie County Medical Center

Originally from Toronto, Ontario, he completed both his dental and medical training at the University at Buffalo and Jacobs School of Medicine, respectively. Following graduation, he remained in Buffalo for his surgical residency. After completion of his maxillofacial training, Dr. Nagai moved to Baltimore, Maryland to pursue advanced fellowship training in head and neck oncologic and reconstructive microsurgery at the University of Maryland and Greenebaum Cancer Center. His focus is on pathologic conditions of the head and neck including oral cavity/pharyngeal and laryngeal cancers, skin cancers, thyroid cancer, salivary gland neoplasms and benign tumors of the craniofacial skeleton. He performs microvascular reconstruction, including free tissue transfers and nerve repair. Dr. Nagai also performs all aspects of sleep apnea surgery including placement of hypoglossal nerve stimulators (Inspire).
He has authored numerous peer reviewed articles and book chapters and maintains involvement with resident education, having appointments within the University at Buffalo’s Department of Otolaryngology and Department of Surgery.

Disclosure: Nothing to disclose

Key:

Complete
Failed
Available
Locked
Faculty and Planner Disclosure
Pre-Quiz
4 Questions  |  1 attempt  |  0/4 points to pass
4 Questions  |  1 attempt  |  0/4 points to pass
Reconstruction of the Maxillectomy Defect
Open to view video.
Open to view video.
Post-Quiz
4 Questions  |  Unlimited attempts  |  3/4 points to pass
4 Questions  |  Unlimited attempts  |  3/4 points to pass
Evaluation
11 Questions
Certificate
1.00 CDE/CME credit  |  Certificate available
1.00 CDE/CME credit  |  Certificate available